Sanskara

The Sanskara Platform CIC Appointed UK Representative to IACM Patients Council

Empowering Patients Worldwide

We are thrilled to announce a significant milestone for The Sanskara Platform CIC – our recent appointment as the UK representative to the International Alliance for Cannabinoid Medicines (IACM) Patients Council. This prestigious position marks a new chapter in our commitment to advocating for patient rights and fostering collaboration on a global scale.

About IACM Patients Council

The IACM Patients Council is a dynamic coalition of patient organisations from around the world. Its primary objective is to provide a unified voice for patients in the rapidly evolving landscape of medicinal cannabis. By working collectively, these organisations aim to safeguard the rights and interests of patients and ensure their perspectives are integral to the ongoing developments in medicinal cannabis.

Our Role as the UK Representative

As the UK representative to the IACM Patients Council, The Sanskara Platform CIC is honoured to take on the responsibility of championing the concerns, aspirations, and needs of patients in the United Kingdom. This role aligns seamlessly with our core mission of promoting a patient-centric approach to medical cannabis advocacy.

Key Focus Areas

  1. Global Collaboration: We look forward to actively engaging with patient organisations worldwide. By fostering international collaboration, we can share insights, best practices, and advocate for the common goal of improving patient access and rights.
  2. Information Exchange: Our role involves facilitating the exchange of information between patients, organisations, and key stakeholders. By doing so, we aim to contribute to the creation of a well-informed and empowered patient community.
  3. Advocacy and Education: Through our representation, we will advocate for policies that prioritise patient well-being. Education will be a focal point, ensuring that patients are equipped with the knowledge to make informed decisions about their healthcare.

The Sanskara Platform CIC’s Commitment

Our journey with the IACM Patients Council is not just about representation; it’s about effecting positive change. The Sanskara Platform CIC is committed to leveraging this opportunity to enhance the dialogue surrounding medicinal cannabis, challenge stigmas, and drive initiatives that benefit patients globally.

We express our gratitude to our supporters, volunteers, and the entire medical cannabis community. Your encouragement has been instrumental in reaching this milestone. Together, let’s continue advancing patient-centric approaches to medical cannabis and shaping a more compassionate and informed world.

Empowering Patients, Transforming Lives.

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Use of Prescription Cannabis at Work

The Sanskara Platform and Seed Our Future Co-Author Report with Cannabis Industry Council Urging Employers to Support Prescription Cannabis Patients

07/11/2023 – The Sanskara Platform, in collaboration with Seed Our Future, is pleased to announce the release of an important report addressing the rights of prescription cannabis patients in the workplace. This ground-breaking report, titled ‘The Use of Prescription Cannabis at Work,’ has been authored by Mohammad Wasway, Founder of The Sanskara Platform, and Guy Coxall, Founder of Seed Our Future. It forms a crucial part of the Standards Working Group within the Cannabis Industry Council (CIC).

The report, highlighted by the CIC, reveals a pressing issue affecting prescription cannabis patients and their rights in the workplace. It suggests that current employer practices may put them at risk of breaching the Equality Act. The Act mandates that employers must make reasonable adjustments to accommodate individuals with disabilities, which includes many prescription cannabis patients who often suffer from chronic pain and disabilities.

The CIC’s report underscores the necessity for employers to treat prescription cannabis patients just like any other medical patients, aligning with their legal obligations under the Equality Act 2010 and the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.

Report co-authors, Mohammad Wasway and Guy Coxall, expressed their concerns, stating, “We have heard from many concerned and vulnerable patients who have been harassed and mistreated by their employers simply for taking their prescription medication. We urge businesses to support their employees and implement sensible and proportionate solutions that will improve employee wellbeing and productivity.”

Elisabetta Faenza, Chair of the CIC Standards Working Group, emphasised the Council’s commitment to upholding workplace rights for prescription cannabis patients, asserting, “The Cannabis Industry Council will be working with employers and unions to uphold workplace rights for prescription cannabis patients, based on law, medicine, and basic compassion. Many businesses say they are committed to equality, diversity, and inclusivity, yet often underdeliver. Now is the time for employers to step up and support ill and disabled employees.”

The report not only sheds light on the medical context surrounding prescription cannabis but also suggests ways to manage its usage by employees. It includes user-friendly flowcharts and illustrative case studies to help employers navigate this complex issue.

Since 2018, specialist doctors have had the authority to prescribe cannabis medicines to their patients, who are then legally permitted to possess and consume this medication. Employers who fail to uphold the workplace rights of patients, including both employees and job applicants, face the risk of being taken to an employment tribunal.

This report is a significant step towards ensuring that prescription cannabis patients receive fair treatment and protection under the law. It calls upon employers to support their employees’ medical needs and uphold the principles of equality, diversity, and inclusivity in the workplace.

Read the report here

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The Cannabis Plant: Nature’s Gift Unveiled

Cannabis Bud AI Generated Image

Introduction

The cannabis plant, scientifically known as Cannabis sativa, has been a part of human history for millennia, revered for its versatility and medicinal properties. In this comprehensive blog, we will explore the fascinating anatomy, life cycle, pollination methods, defence mechanisms, habitats, and diverse types, shapes, and colours of the cannabis plant. Let’s embark on this journey of discovery and unravel the enigmatic world of cannabis.

Anatomy of the Cannabis Plant

The cannabis plant is a hardy, dioecious flowering plant, meaning it has separate male and female reproductive structures. Below is a simple table illustrating the basic anatomy of the cannabis plant:

Plant PartFunction
LeavesPhotosynthesis and transpiration
StemsSupport, nutrient transport, and storage
Flowers (Buds)Reproductive structures containing cannabinoids
SeedsReproduction and dispersal of the species
RootsAnchoring, nutrient and water absorption

1. Cola:

The Cola refers to the cluster of buds at the top of the female cannabis plant. It contains high concentrations of cannabinoids, such as THC and CBD, making it a crucial component for medical cannabis production. Colas are carefully cultivated and harvested for their therapeutic properties, contributing to the medicinal benefits of the plant.

2. Sugar Leaf:

Sugar Leaves are the small, sugar-coated leaves that surround the Cola and other buds. These leaves contain trichomes, which are resin-producing glands responsible for synthesising cannabinoids and terpenes. Sugar Leaves are also utilised in medical cannabis preparations due to their cannabinoid-rich content.

3. Pistil and Stigma:

Pistils and Stigmas are the reproductive structures of the female cannabis plant. The Pistil consists of the Stigma, which is a hair-like structure designed to capture pollen during pollination. While cannabis growers typically remove male plants to prevent seed development, these female reproductive components play a significant role in medical cannabis production as they are rich in cannabinoids and other beneficial compounds.

4. Trichomes:

Trichomes are tiny, crystal-like structures that cover the surface of cannabis plants, including the Cola and Sugar Leaves. These structures are the powerhouse of medicinal compounds, housing a majority of the cannabinoids and terpenes responsible for the therapeutic effects of medical cannabis. Trichomes are carefully preserved during harvesting to ensure maximum medicinal potency.

5. Fan Leaf:

Fan Leaves are the large, fan-shaped leaves that emerge from the cannabis plant’s branches. While they contain minimal cannabinoid content, they play a crucial role in the photosynthesis process, providing the plant with the energy it needs to produce therapeutic compounds. Fan Leaves also contribute to the overall health and vigour of the medical cannabis plant.

6. Bract and Calyx:

Bracts are modified leaves found at the base of each Cola, while Calyxes are small, cup-like structures that encase the cannabis seeds when pollinated. While Bracts and Calyxes have limited cannabinoid content, they are essential components for medical cannabis growers as they protect and support seed development, which is crucial for strain preservation and breeding purposes.

Life Cycle of the Cannabis Plant

The life cycle of the cannabis plant consists of several stages, each crucial for its survival and propagation. Let’s take a look at the key phases:

  1. Germination: The life cycle begins with a seed, which germinates when exposed to water, light, and suitable temperature conditions.
  2. Vegetative Stage: During this phase, the plant focuses on vegetative growth, producing leaves and stems. It requires ample light, nutrients, and water.
  3. Flowering Stage: As the plant matures, it enters the flowering stage. Female plants develop buds containing cannabinoids, while male plants produce pollen for pollination.
  4. Pollination: Cannabis plants employ various pollination methods, primarily wind pollination or insect-facilitated pollination.
  5. Seed Production: If pollination is successful, female plants produce seeds within their buds.
  6. Death and Decay: After seed production, the plant completes its life cycle and eventually dies or goes dormant.

Pollination Methods of the Cannabis Plant

The cannabis plant has developed different strategies for pollination. The two main methods are:

  1. Wind Pollination: In this method, male cannabis plants release pollen grains into the air, which are carried by the wind and may land on female flowers, leading to fertilisation and seed production.
  2. Insect-Facilitated Pollination: Some cannabis strains have co-evolved with insects like bees and butterflies to facilitate pollination. These insects visit male flowers, collect pollen, and transfer it to female flowers, aiding in fertilisation.

Defence Mechanisms of the Cannabis Plant

To protect itself from predators and environmental stressors, the cannabis plant deploys various defence mechanisms. These include:

  1. Cannabinoids: Cannabis plants produce a range of cannabinoids, including THC and CBD, which can deter herbivores and insects.
  2. Trichomes: Tiny hair-like structures on the surface of cannabis leaves and buds secrete resin, which contains cannabinoids and terpenes that can repel pests.
  3. Smell: The strong aroma produced by cannabis plants can attract pollinators and beneficial insects while repelling potential threats.
  4. Adaptability: Cannabis plants can adjust their growth patterns and chemistry in response to environmental conditions, enabling them to survive in various habitats.

Habitats of the Cannabis Plant

The cannabis plant is remarkably adaptable and can thrive in diverse habitats, including:

  1. Outdoor Environments: Cannabis grows well in temperate climates with long growing seasons, such as parts of North America, Europe, and Asia.
  2. Indoor Cultivation: Controlled indoor environments with appropriate lighting, temperature, and humidity can also support cannabis growth.
  3. Greenhouses: Greenhouses offer a balance between outdoor and indoor cultivation, providing a controlled environment with natural light.

Various Types, Shapes, and Colours of Cannabis

Cannabis exhibits a wide array of types, shapes, and colours, influenced by factors such as genetics, cultivation techniques, and environmental conditions. Below are some common cannabis types:

TypeShapeColour
SativaTall, slenderLight green, orange, yellow
IndicaShort, bushyDark green, purple
RuderalisSmall and ruggedPale green
HybridsVaries depending on mixCombination of colours

Conclusion

The cannabis plant is a remarkable botanical wonder, with a rich history and countless applications in various fields. Understanding its anatomy, life cycle, pollination methods, defence mechanisms, habitats, and diverse characteristics can foster appreciation for this extraordinary plant. Whether it’s for medical purposes, recreational use, or industrial applications, the cannabis plant continues to intrigue and amaze humanity, reminding us of the wonders of nature.

Disclaimer:
This post aims to provide general information about the cannabis plant. Cultivation, possession, and use of cannabis is illegal without the correct authorisation Always abide by the laws and regulations put in place. Consult a qualified professional for personalised advice related to medical cannabis.

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Dosing Guidance for Dry Herb Vaporising

Dry herb vaporising offers a precise and efficient way to consume cannabis, allowing users to experience the therapeutic benefits of cannabinoids and terpenes without the potential harms associated with smoking. To ensure a safe and enjoyable vaporising experience, it’s essential to understand the boiling points of various terpenes and cannabinoids and how they impact the effects of cannabis.

Importance of Temperature Control
Temperature control is a critical aspect of dry herb vaporising, as different compounds in cannabis vaporise at specific temperatures. By adjusting the temperature, users can target specific cannabinoids and terpenes to customise their experience.

Boiling Points of Common Cannabinoids

Cannabinoid Boiling Point (°C)
THC 157°C
CBD 160-180°C
CBG 52-65°C
CBN 185°C
CBC 220°C
THCV 220°C

Boiling Points of Common Terpenes

Terpene Boiling Point (°C)
Myrcene 167°C
Limonene 176°C
Pinene 155°C
Linalool 198°C
Caryophyllene 130°C
Humulene 198°C
Terpinolene 185°C
Bisabolol 329°C
Eucalyptol 176°C
Guaiol 167°C
Nerolidol 161°C
Phytol 160°C

Dosage and Temperature Recommendations:

Cannabinoid / Terpene Temperature Range (°C) Potential Effects and Benefits
THC 157°C Euphoria, Relaxation, Pain Relief
CBD 160-180°C Anti-inflammatory, Anxiolytic, Anticonvulsant
CBG 52-65°C Neuroprotective, Anti-inflammatory, Potential Antibacterial Effects
CBN 185°C Mild Sedation, Potential Sleep Aid
CBC 220°C Anti-inflammatory, Potential Antidepressant Effects
THCV 220°C Potential Appetite Suppressant, Anticonvulsant
Myrcene 167°C Sedating, Relaxing, Potential Anti-inflammatory Effects
Limonene 176°C Uplifting, Mood-Enhancing, Potential Antioxidant Effects
Pinene 155°C Alertness, Memory Enhancement, Potential Bronchodilator
Linalool 198°C Calming, Stress-Reducing, Potential Analgesic Effects
Caryophyllene 130°C Anti-inflammatory, Potential Gastro-protective Effects, No Psychoactive effects
Humulene 198°C Anti-inflammatory, Potential Appetite Suppressant
Terpinolene 185°C Uplifting, Potential Antioxidant and Anticancer Effects
Bisabolol 329°C Calming, Potential Anti-inflammatory and Antioxidant Effects
Eucalyptol 176°C Potential Anti-inflammatory and Analgesic Effects
Guaiol 167°C Potential Anti-inflammatory and Antioxidant Effects
Nerolidol 161°C Calming, Potential Sedative and Anti-fungal Effects
Phytol 160°C Potential Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Effects

Dosage Recommendations
Dosage for dry herb vaporising depends on several factors, including individual tolerance, desired effects, the potency of the cannabis strain and prescriber’s guidance. Start with a low dose and gradually increase until the desired effects are achieved.

Safety Considerations
Always use a reputable vaporiser with accurate temperature controls to ensure precise dosing and avoid combustion. High temperatures (above 230°C) may produce harmful by-products and should be avoided.

Conclusion
Dry herb vaporising provides a customisable and controlled method of cannabis consumption. Understanding the boiling points of cannabinoids and a wide range of terpenes allows users to fine-tune their experience and target specific effects. Start with low temperatures and dosage, gradually increasing as needed, to enjoy the full potential of cannabinoids and terpenes while minimising potential adverse effects.

Disclaimer: The information provided in this context is intended for general informational purposes only and should not be construed as medical advice under any circumstances. It is essential to consult with a qualified healthcare professional or medical practitioner before making any decisions or taking any actions related to medical treatment or dosing. The content here does not replace professional medical guidance, and any reliance on the information presented is at your own risk. We strive to maintain accuracy and up-to-date information; however, we do not warrant the completeness, reliability, or validity of the information provided. Therefore, we disclaim any liability for any adverse outcomes or damages arising from the use or misuse of the information mentioned here. Always seek personalised medical advice from a licensed healthcare provider for your specific medical condition or situation.

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Releaf Report Reveals Limited Access and Lack of Awareness Surrounding Medicinal Cannabis in the UK

Introduction


Releaf, the UK’s first all-in-one medicinal cannabis e-clinic, has released the findings of its comprehensive report on medicinal cannabis usage in the country. The report, based on a survey of 4,210 respondents, highlights the significant lack of prescriptions and widespread public unawareness of the legal status of medicinal cannabis in the UK. In this blog post, we will delve into the key insights from the report and shed light on the challenges faced by patients and the need for increased awareness and access to this alternative treatment option.

releaf.co.uk

High Eligibility, Low Prescription Rates


The Releaf report reveals that an estimated 50.2% of the UK population, approximately 29.6 million people, could be eligible for a medicinal cannabis prescription. However, only 0.48% of the population has received such a prescription. This significant disparity highlights the limited availability of medical cannabis and the challenges patients face in accessing this potentially beneficial treatment.

releaf.co.uk

Distress and Discomfort of Untreated Conditions


Among the respondents with conditions suitable for medicinal cannabis treatment, 45.6% reported living with significant distress and discomfort. Chronic pain, depression, cancer, and migraines were cited as some of the most prevalent treatable illnesses. These findings emphasise the potential for medical cannabis to alleviate suffering and improve the quality of life for individuals living with these conditions.

releaf.co.uk

Lack of Awareness of Legal Status


Despite the legalisation of medicinal cannabis for prescriptions in 2018, the report indicates that 58.5% of respondents were unsure of its legal status in the UK. This lack of awareness contributes to the societal stigma surrounding medical cannabis and inhibits patients from exploring it as a viable treatment option.

releaf.co.uk

Social Stigma and Hesitation


The Releaf report highlights the social stigma associated with medicinal cannabis use. Approximately 34.16% of respondents expressed concerns about using medical cannabis due to the fear of being mistaken for engaging in illegal activities. Moreover, 16.86% of participants worried about disapproval from friends and family, indicating the need for a more open and understanding societal attitude towards this form of treatment.

releaf.co.uk

Medicinal Cannabis Benefits


Medicinal cannabis was legalised in the UK for prescriptions in 2018, and numerous studies have documented its potential to improve symptoms such as chronic pain, fatigue, anxiety, and more. Conditions eligible for medicinal cannabis treatment include chronic pain, depression, cancer, and migraines. Data from the Releaf report showed that 19.74% of respondents reported having anxiety, making it the most prevalent diagnosed condition suitable for medical cannabis treatment.

The Call for Awareness and Change


Mason Soiza, founder and CEO of Releaf, emphasises the importance of spreading awareness and challenging negative perceptions surrounding medicinal cannabis. The report reveals that over two-thirds (67.67%) of people would consider using medical cannabis as a treatment option. This highlights the potential benefits associated with medicinal cannabis and the need to change societal beliefs to provide access to those who can clinically benefit from it.

Dr. Stephen D’Souza, Medical Director at Releaf, further stresses the need for additional research on the efficacy of medicinal cannabis and the potential to treat symptoms like depression, migraines, and gut health. With more research, the goal is to spread greater awareness and change public perceptions regarding this alternative form of treatment.

Releaf’s All-in-One Medicinal Cannabis E-Clinic
As part of its campaign, Releaf plans to launch the UK’s first all-in-one medicinal cannabis e-clinic later this summer. The platform offers a wholly online, discreet service for those seeking an assessment for prescription medical cannabis. The unique approach involves video consultations with leading cannabis specialist doctors, offering personalised strains and recommended dosages, and facilitating the prescription process.

releaf.co.uk

Conclusion


The Releaf report highlights the significant lack of prescriptions and public awareness regarding medicinal cannabis in the UK. With a high proportion of the population eligible for this form of treatment, it is crucial to address the barriers to access and reduce the social stigma associated with medical cannabis. By increasing awareness and understanding, the potential benefits of medicinal cannabis can be realised, improving the lives of millions of individuals living with treatable conditions. Releaf’s report serves as a call to action for policymakers, healthcare professionals, and the public to support evidence-based policies and create a more inclusive and informed environment for patients seeking alternative treatment options like medical cannabis.

Note: The information presented in this blog post is based on the findings of the Releaf report and the associated press release. For more details and to access the full report, please visit the Releaf website at releaf.co.uk.

To support The Sanskara Platform with our mission to raise awareness and increase access to medical cannabis, visit our support us page and check out our patient outreach page.

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Hexahydrocannabinol (HHC): Exploring the Potential Medical Applications of this Novel Compound

Hexahydrocannabinol (HHC) Structural Formula
Hexahydrocannabinol (HHC) Structural Formula

Introduction

In the rapidly advancing field of medical cannabis, researchers and manufacturers continuously explore new cannabinoids with the potential for therapeutic benefits. Hexahydrocannabinol (HHC), a lesser-known compound found in cannabis plants, has attracted attention due to its unique properties and potential medical applications. This comprehensive blog post aims to provide medical cannabis patients and academics with an in-depth understanding of HHC, including its definition, pros and cons, sources, manufacturing processes, and potential medical uses.

What is Hexahydrocannabinol (HHC)?

Hexahydrocannabinol (HHC) is a naturally occurring cannabinoid found in cannabis plants. Structurally similar to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive component of cannabis, HHC features a slightly altered molecular structure. Like other cannabinoids, HHC is derived from cannabigerolic acid (CBGA), the precursor molecule for various cannabinoids in the cannabis plant.

Pros of Hexahydrocannabinol (HHC)

  1. Therapeutic Potential: Preliminary research suggests that HHC may possess therapeutic properties, including analgesic (pain-relieving), anti-inflammatory, and anti-anxiety effects. Further studies are necessary to investigate its potential in treating specific medical conditions.
  2. Alternative to THC: HHC provides an alternative for patients who may experience adverse effects or discomfort associated with high levels of THC consumption. It may offer a more balanced and subtle psychoactive experience while potentially reducing THC-related side effects.
  3. Novel Cannabinoid: HHC expands the range of cannabinoids available for researchers to explore, contributing to our understanding of the complex chemistry of cannabis and its medicinal applications. It presents an exciting opportunity to uncover new therapeutic possibilities.

Cons of Hexahydrocannabinol (HHC)

  1. Limited Research: As a relatively new cannabinoid, scientific research on HHC remains limited. This lack of comprehensive studies makes it challenging to fully assess its safety profile, potential side effects, and long-term impacts. Further research is needed to evaluate its efficacy and safety in various medical contexts.
  2. Regulatory Status: The legal and regulatory status of HHC may vary across different jurisdictions. It is crucial for patients and consumers to adhere to local laws and regulations regarding the use and possession of HHC-containing products. Engaging in transparent and open communication with healthcare professionals is essential.

Sources of Hexahydrocannabinol (HHC)

HHC can be found in cannabis plants, albeit in relatively low concentrations compared to other cannabinoids like THC and CBD. It is primarily obtained through specialized cultivation techniques and genetic selection to enhance HHC production in specific cannabis strains. Cultivators employ careful breeding strategies to optimize the production of this unique cannabinoid.

Manufacturing Hexahydrocannabinol (HHC)

The manufacturing process for HHC involves several crucial steps, including extraction, isolation, and purification. Here is a detailed overview of the process:

  1. Extraction: The initial step involves extracting the desired cannabinoids, including HHC, from cannabis plant material. Common extraction methods include solvent-based techniques such as hydrocarbon or ethanol extraction. These methods help separate the cannabinoids from the plant material, resulting in a crude extract.
  2. Isolation: Following extraction, the crude cannabinoid extract undergoes further purification to isolate HHC. Techniques like chromatography, crystallization, or distillation are employed to separate HHC from other cannabinoids and impurities present in the crude extract. The specific isolation method may vary based on the desired purity and intended application of the HHC.
  3. Purification: To obtain a high-purity form of HHC, additional purification steps are necessary. Filtration techniques, solvent removal, and further chromatographic separations can be employed to remove residual impurities and enhance the purity of the HHC isolate.
  4. Formulation: Once the purified HHC is obtained, it can be incorporated into various delivery systems such as oils, tinctures, capsules, or topical products, depending on the desired application and patient needs. These formulations enable convenient and precise dosing for medical cannabis patients.

Potential Medical Applications of Hexahydrocannabinol (HHC)

While research on HHC is still in its early stages, several potential medical applications have been proposed based on the known effects of cannabinoids. These potential applications include:

  1. Pain Management: HHC’s analgesic properties may make it a potential candidate for managing chronic pain conditions. Further research is needed to evaluate its effectiveness in different pain syndromes and compare it to existing treatments.
  2. Inflammation: Studies suggest that HHC might possess anti-inflammatory properties, which could be explored in the treatment of inflammatory conditions such as arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
  3. Anxiety and Mood Disorders: HHC’s potential anxiolytic effects may offer benefits in managing anxiety and mood disorders. Further research is necessary to explore its efficacy, safety, and optimal dosing regimens.
  4. Neurological Disorders: Given the complex interaction between cannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system in the brain, HHC could be investigated for its potential in neuroprotective and neurodegenerative disorders like epilepsy, multiple sclerosis (MS), and Parkinson’s disease.

Conclusion

Hexahydrocannabinol (HHC) represents a novel cannabinoid that holds promise for therapeutic applications within the field of medical cannabis. While research on HHC is still limited, its potential benefits and unique properties warrant further investigation. Medical cannabis patients considering the use of HHC-containing products should consult healthcare professionals and adhere to local laws and regulations. As scientific knowledge expands, a better understanding of HHC’s advantages, drawbacks, and optimal medical applications will emerge, contributing to the advancement of cannabis-based therapies.

Sources

  1. Russo, E. B. (2011). Taming THC: potential cannabis synergy and phytocannabinoid-terpenoid entourage effects. British Journal of Pharmacology, 163(7), 1344-1364.
  2. Navarro, G., et al. (2020). Cannabigerol action at cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors and at CB1–CB2 heteroreceptor complexes. Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, 5(1), 66-75.
  3. Hazekamp, A., et al. (2016). Cannabis—From cultivar to chemovar II: A metabolomics approach to cannabis classification. Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, 1(1), 202-215.

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Unveiling the Rich History of Cannabis in China

UNVEILING THE RICH HISTORY OF CANNABIS IN CHINA

Introduction

Dive into the captivating world of cannabis as we embark on a historical journey through China’s profound relationship with this remarkable plant. In this extensively researched blog post, we explore the multifaceted history of cannabis in China. From ancient origins to its resurgence in modern medicine, we uncover its cultural significance, medicinal applications, and the evolving landscape surrounding its use.

Ancient Origins: A Legacy Rooted in Tradition

Cannabis cultivation in China dates back thousands of years, with archeological evidence suggesting its use as early as the Neolithic period. The plant, known as “da ma” (大妈) or “” () played a central role in Chinese society. It was cultivated for its versatile fibres, which were transformed into textiles, ropes, and paper, supporting the development of ancient Chinese civilisation.

Historical Medicinal Practices: Honouring the Wisdom of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)

Cannabis holds a revered place in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), a holistic healing system that has been practiced for centuries. Ancient Chinese medical texts, such as the “Shennong Ben Cao Jing” from around 100 AD, document the therapeutic properties of cannabis. It was utilised to address a range of ailments, including pain, inflammation, malaria, and gynaecological disorders, showcasing the extensive knowledge of herbal medicine in ancient China.

Taoist Philosophy: Cannabis as a Path to Spiritual Enlightenment

Taoism, a profound philosophical and religious tradition, embraced the spiritual aspects of cannabis. Within the teachings of Taoist philosophy, cannabis was believed to enhance meditation, perception, and communication with the divine. Notably, the “Baopuzi” (抱朴子) a text authored by Ge Hong during the Jin dynasty, details the ritualistic use of cannabis for transcendent experiences and spiritual enlightenment.

Literature and Art: Cannabis in China as an Inspiration for Creativity

Throughout Chinese history, cannabis found its way into literature and art, serving as a muse for creativity. Esteemed poets, such as Li Bai from the Tang dynasty, celebrated the plant’s intoxicating effects in their works, elevating cannabis as a symbol of transcendence and poetic inspiration. The profound influence of cannabis on Chinese literature is a testament to its cultural significance and enduring allure.

Prohibition and Recent Developments: Navigating Changing Tides

In the 20th century, China implemented strict drug control policies, leading to the prohibition of cannabis. However, recent years have witnessed a renewed focus on cannabis, specifically its medicinal potential. The Chinese government has initiated research and development projects exploring cannabis-based pharmaceuticals, with a particular emphasis on cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive compound of the plant.

Conclusion:

Delving into the rich history of cannabis in China unveils its enduring significance in various aspects of Chinese culture. From its ancient origins as a versatile resource to its integral role in traditional medicine and spiritual practices, cannabis has left an indelible mark on Chinese society. As medical cannabis patients in the UK, exploring the historical context and cultural significance of cannabis in China can deepen our understanding of this remarkable plant’s potential benefits.

Sources:

1. “Cannabis in Chinese Medicine: Are Some Traditional Indications Referenced in Ancient Literature Related to Cannabinoids?” – Journal of Ethnopharmacology

2. “Cannabis in Chinese Medicine: Are Some Traditional Indications Referenced in Ancient Literature Related to Cannabinoids?” – ResearchGate

3. “Cannabis in Chinese Medicine” – The Botanical Source

4. “The History of Cannabis in China: An Ancient Plant with Many Uses” – The Third Wave

Disclaimer: This blog post is for informational purposes only and should not be considered medical advice. Consult with healthcare professionals before using cannabis for medicinal purposes, and adhere to the regulations and guidelines set by the relevant authorities.

More Educational Posts…

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Support Free Medical Cannabis Education: Join The Sanskara Platform Community!

Welcome to The Sanskara Platform’s Patreon page! We are dedicated to empowering UK patients by providing free education and resources on medical cannabis. Our mission is to ensure that every patient has access to the information they need to make informed decisions about their health.

Through our Patreon page, you can directly support our cause and help us continue providing high-quality content and valuable resources to patients in need. Your patronage will contribute to the maintenance of our website, the creation of educational materials, and the expansion of our outreach efforts.

Join us as we work towards advancing the medical cannabis industry in the UK. By becoming a patron, you not only gain exclusive benefits but also become an integral part of our community of supporters who are passionate about improving patient care and well-being.

Membership:

1. Seedling Supporter – £5 per month:

– Early access to new educational content

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2. Blossom Advocate – £10 per month:

– All benefits of the Seedling Supporter tier

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– All benefits of the Blossom Advocate tier

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– All benefits of the Evergreen Champion tier

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Your membership support will directly contribute to our ability to provide free resources, maintain our website, and expand our reach to help even more patients. Every tier offers unique benefits, allowing you to engage with our platform and be a part of the positive change we strive for.

Thank you for considering becoming a patron of The Sanskara Platform. Together, we can make a difference in the lives of UK patients seeking medical cannabis education and resources!

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Your Guide to Importing Medical Cannabis on Your Next Holiday

Travel Abroad With Medical Cannabis

Are you planning to travel abroad with medical cannabis from the UK? It can be a daunting task to navigate the various regulations and import laws of each destination country. Fortunately, The Sanskara Platform has compiled a comprehensive guide to help you with the process.

The Sanskara Platform is an online resource that provides guidance on medical cannabis for patients, caregivers, and healthcare professionals. They have recently released a new table of information that outlines the regulations for importing medical cannabis into several popular British holiday destinations.

The table provides a detailed breakdown of the import laws and regulations for each country, along with contact information for the relevant embassy departments. This makes it easier for patients to plan their travel and ensure they have the necessary documentation and permissions to bring their medication with them.

It is important to note that each country has its own regulations, and it is essential to consult with the relevant embassy or consulate before travelling. The Sanskara Platform’s guide can serve as a starting point, but it is not a substitute for professional legal advice.

If you are planning to travel abroad from the UK with a medical cannabis prescription, make sure to check out The Sanskara Platform’s table of information. It can be accessed via their website at https://thesanskaraplatform.co.uk/travelling-abroad/.

Medical cannabis is a rapidly growing industry and has proven to be effective in treating various health conditions. However, different countries have varying regulations regarding the importation of medical cannabis. The Sanskara Platform has created a table of information that outlines the necessary details and contact details/links for the importation of medical cannabis into popular British holiday destinations.

Australia, Bahamas, Belgium, Bermuda, Czech Republic, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Jamaica, Netherlands, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Thailand, Trinidad & Tobago, and Turkey are included in the table. Among these countries, Germany, Poland, and Portugal allow for the importation of medical cannabis for personal use with certain conditions.

Germany permits the importation of cannabis for personal use if prescribed by a doctor on the German list of narcotics. The patient is required to complete a form similar to the provided template and obtain confirmation from the supervising health authority of the patient’s county/area of residence. The patient can carry the cannabis for up to 30 days.

In Poland, a patient may bring medicines to the country for personal use not exceeding five smallest packages. However, the patient needs to complete a document for import/export of narcotic drugs/psychotropic substances for medical needs and obtain consent from the Chief Pharmaceutical Inspectorate.

In Portugal, patients can bring a higher amount of medication than required for the stay to anticipate unforeseen events. For medicines containing controlled substances, including cannabis, patients can bring only the amount required for 30 days of treatment with a medical justification/doctor’s statement. Patients are advised to contact the authority responsible for Customs and/or Civil Aviation in their country to find out the necessary documents required to transport medical cannabis.

Greece allows visitors to bring products for personal health use, such as medicines, food supplements, antiseptics, cosmetics, medical devices, etc., for personal use during their stay. However, visitors are required to bring just enough of each product to cover their needs during their stay and hold a letter from their doctor stating the medication(s) they are carrying.

Overall, it is essential to research and understand the regulations of the destination country regarding the importation of medical cannabis before travelling. The Sanskara Platform’s table of information provides a valuable resource for individuals travelling to popular British holiday destinations with medical cannabis needs.

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